Strong visual hierarchy is when it is clear to the user in what order to view visual elements on the screen. The visual hierarchy creates consistency and smoothly guides the user’s gaze from one interface element to another. With a weak visual hierarchy, the interface looks overloaded and incomprehensible – the gaze jumps across the screen and is always tense. It is difficult to maintain a strong visual hierarchy if the interface is constantly changing: when everything is in bold, assume that nothing is highlighted. As soon as a new element appears in the hierarchical system, the designer has to edit the visual weights of all other elements in order to achieve a strong hierarchy again. Most people don’t notice visual hierarchy at all, but it can easily enhance (or weaken) a design.